Tag Archive for 'verbos'

Diferencias que sufren las terceras personas del singular

Diferencias que sufren las terceras personas del singular

A continuación ponemos ejemplos de las diferencias que sufren las llamadas terceras personas del singular: He (él), She (ella), it (ello, forma neutra que no existe en castellano y se utiliza para referirnos a cosas, eventos (como estados meterológicos, reuniones, acontecimientos en general) o animales de los que no sabemos su sexo).
Estas diferencias de las terceras personas del singular solo se da en todas las formas del presente: Present simple y Present continuos, Present perfect simple y Present perfect continuous.

Verbo To be:
Frase afirmativa: She is tired / She’s tired (Ella está cansada)
Frase negativa: She is not tired / She isn’t tired (Ella no está cansada)
Frase interrogativa: Is she tired? (¿Está ella cansada?)

Verbo Have got:
Frase afirmativa: He has got a car / He’s got a car (Él tiene un coche)
Frase negativa: He has not got a car / He hasn’t got a car (Él no tiene un coche)
Frase interrogativa: Has he got a car? (¿Tiene él un coche?)

Otros Verbos:
Frase afirmativa: It rains every day (Llueve cada día)
Frase negativa: It does not rain every day / It doesn’t rain every day (No llueve cada día)
Frase interrogativa: Does it rain every day? (¿Llueve cada día?)

Formas de caminar – Ways of walking

ways of walking En Inglés, a veces hay muchas formas de expresar algo que en español usamos simplemente una sola palabra.
Por ejemplo, en español decimos caminar, en inglés, hay un muchos verbos específicos para acciones relacionadas con el verbo andar: arrastrarse, caminar de puntillas, caminar rápido, caminar deslizándose, caminar dando tumbos,…

  • walk: move on one’s feet.
    We walked to town.
  • limp: walk unevenly because one leg is hurt.
    That man is hurt, he’s limping.
  • hobble: walk with difficulty.
    The old man hobbled along the street with the aid of his stick.
  • stagger: walk unsteadily as if about to fall.
    He was so drunk that he staggered all the way home.
  • stumble: stagger.
    She stumbled upstairs and into bed.
  • lurch: stagger.
    The drunken man was lurching along the street.
  • tiptoe: walk on the tips of one’s toes.
    She tiptoed to the bed so as not to wake the baby.
  • stroll: walk for pleasure.
    They srolled around the park.
  • amble: walk at a slow, leisurely pace.
    They ambled along for miles.
  • saunter: stroll.
    They sauntered around the park.
  • wander: move without a fixed purpose or destination.
    They enjoy wandering through the countryside.
  • roam: wander.
    They roamed through the streets for hours.
  • ramble: walk for pleasure with no particular destination.
    He likes rambling around in the country.
  • mooch: wander, walk slowly without any purpose.
    John mooched about the shops.
  • meander: walk in a slow, relaxed way instead of taking the most direct way possible. (Rivers also meander).
    As I was sitting in the park, I watched as couples seemed to meander around happily.
  • stride: walk with long steps.
    She strode across the fields.
  • strut: walk in a proud way, with the chest out and trying to look important.
    He strutted past us, ignoring our greeting.
  • swagger: walk proudly, strut.
    After winning the first prize, the player swaggered about proudly.
  • stalk: walk in a proud or angry way, with long steps.
    The teacher turned and stalked out of the classroom.
  • trudge: walk slowly and with effort because one is tired.
    We were very tired after trudging through the deep snow for two hours.
  • shuffle: walk very slowly and noisily, without lifting one’s feet off the ground..
    His legs were aching so much that he shuffled to bed.
  • stump: walk heavily and stiffly.
    They stumped up the hill.
  • plod: walk with heavy steps or with difficulty.
    Labourers plodded home through the muddy fields.
  • pace: walk with regular steps.
    He paced up and down the platform, waiting for the train.
  • march: walk with regular steps of equal length.
    Demonstrators marched through the streets of the city.
  • parade: walk or march together to celebrate or protest.
    Demonstrators paraded through the streets of the city.
  • crawl: move slowly with the body close to the ground or on hands and knees.
    A baby crawls before he can walk.
  • toddle: walk with short unsteady steps.
    Her two-year-old son toddled into the room.
  • edge: move gradually with small movements.
    Paul decided to edge away from the crowd.
  • creep: move slowly and quietly with the body close to the ground.
    The cat crept silently towards the bird.
  • sneak: go quietly and secretly in order to avoid being seen or heard.
    The boy sneaked in without paying.
  • pad: walk softly and quietly.
    The child padded barefoot down the stairs.
  • prowl: walk slowly and quietly because you are involved in a criminal activity or because you are looking for something.
    Street gangs usually prowl this alley.
  • slide: move smoothly over a surface.
    I was sliding on the ice.
  • slip: slide accidentally.
    She slipped on the ice and broke her leg.
  • dash: move quickly and suddenly, rush.
    I must dash or I’ll miss the train.
  • dart: move quickly and suddenly in the specified direction.
    She darted away when I came in.
  • scamper: run quickly and playfully.
    The children were scampering up the steps.
  • sprint: run very quickly for a short distance.
    The kids sprinted down the stairs.
  • jog: run slowly and steadily, as a way of exercising.
    She goes jogging everyday.
  • trip over: catch one’s foot on something and stumble or fall.
    He tripped over the step and fell.
  • scuttle: move quickly with short steps, because you are afraid or do not want to be noticed.
    The mouse scuttled off when we entered the room.
  • scurry: move quickly with short steps, because you are in a hurry.
    He was late so he had to scurry off to work.
  • skip: move forward with quick steps and jumps.
    The child skipped with joy towards his father.
  • lope: run with long steps.
    The man loped off after the ball.
  • lollop: run with long awkward steps.
    The dog came lolloping down the path.
  • tear: run or move quickly in a dangerous or careless way.
    When the storm started, they tore back into the house.
  • rush: hurry, move quickly because you need to get somewhere soon.
    She was late so she decided to rush off down the hall.
  • hop: move by jumping on one foot.
    The man hopped down the road after hurting his foot.
  • trip: walk with short quick steps, usually as young girls do.
    The little girl tripped happily up the road.
  • lunge: make a sudden movement towards somebody or something.
    The boxer lunged forward and grabbed his opponent by the arm.
  • scramble: climb up or down, or over something quickly and with difficulty.
    They had to scramble up to the top of the hill to see the view.
  • hike: take a long walk in the mountains or countryside, as an adventure.
    The group hiked up to the top of the hill.
  • trek: hike; make a long, difficult journey on foot.
    For ten days she trekked across the mountains of China.
  • paddle (GB), wade (US): walk for pleasure without shoes or socks in water that is not very deep.
    The children were paddling in the lake.
  • waddle: walk with short steps, moving the body from one side to another, used especially to talk about birds or people with fat bodies.
    The fat man waddled off to the restaurant for lunch.
  • prance: walk with high steps or large movements, in a confident way.
    She pranced around her room, pretending to be an actress.
  • frogmarch: force somebody to walk by holding his arms tightly by his side, usually because of bad behaviour.
    The prefect frogmarched the boy to the detention room.

Formas de mirar en inglés

Ways of looking En Inglés, a veces hay muchas formas de expresar algo que en español usamos simplemente una sola palabra.
Por ejemplo, para mirar. En inglés hay un verbo concreto para especificar lo que en español diríamos mirar detenidamente, mirar de reojo, mirar con desprecio, mirar rápidamente, mirar indiscretamente, etc.

Aquí os listamos unos ejemplos:

# look: give attention to what one is seeing; turn the eyes and see in a certain direction.
Look at that cute baby!

# see: use the power of sight.
See! Here she comes!

# watch: look at some activity or event; keep one’s eyes fixed on something.
The boys watched television all the afternoon.

# gaze: look at something for a long time, in surprise or admiration.
She gazed at him in disbelief when he told her the news.

# stare: look at something for a long time with the eyes wide open.
She was staring into space.

# gawk = gawp: stare impolitely.
Many people gathered to gawp at the crashed car.

# gape: look at something with one’s mouth open.
She gaped at him in surprise.

# glance: have a quick look at something.
She glanced at her watch.

# scan: look quickly at something without careful reading.
He scanned the newspaper over breakfast.

# glare: stare angrily or fiercely.
She didn’t answered, but just glared silently at me.

# peer: look very carefully, as if not able to see well.
He peered at me over his spectacles.

# peep: look quickly and cautiously.
He was caught peeping through the keyhole.

# observe: watch carefully.
The police observed the man entering the bank.

# glimpse: have a passing view of something or someone. Usually used in the expression to catch a glimpse of.
He could catch a glimpse of the president among the crowd.

# spot: recognize someone suddenly among many others.
He was spotted by the police boarding a plane for Berlin.

# behold: old use of the verb to see.
Behold the king!

# view: (technical) look thouroughly; regard, consider.
That film hasn’t been viewed by the censor yet.

# sight: see for the first time.
The men in the ship finally sighted land.

# leer: look in an unpleasant way, suggesting ill will or lust.
The man leered at the young girl

# blink: shut and open the eyes quickly.
How long can you stare without blinking?

# wink: close one eye briefly, as a signal to somebody.
He winked at me to show that he was just joking.

# frown: look in a worried or angry way, moving down the eyebrows together.
He read the telegram, frowning at its contents.

# scowl: frown angrily.
She was very angry and scowled at him while she talked.

# squint: look with eyes half shut or turned sideways, or through a narrow opening.
She squinted through the letter-box and saw an envelope.

# peek: look quickly and secretively.
She found her brother peeking at her diary.

# ogle: look or stare (at a woman) suggesting sexual interest.
Most women hate being ogled at.

# goggle: look with the eyes wide open in surprise or shock. (old-fashioned)
People were goggling at her as if she were from another planet.

# eyeball: look directly or closely.
Francis eyeballed a beautiful woman at the party.

# take a gander at something: (informal) look at something.

# cast an eye on/over something: look at something, examine something.

# browse: look through the pages of a book or magazine; look at the goods in a shop without really wanting to buy anything.
Sheila spent all the afternoon browsing the boutiques.

# scrutinize: examine thoroughly and carefully.
John scrutinized the painting at the museum.

Pronunciación de poner fin a la ed – Pronunciation of the ed ending

Pronunciation of the ed ending

The ending ed is usually not pronounced as a separate syllable. For instance, in each of the following examples, both the bare infinitive and the past participle consist of one syllable. For example:

Bare Infinitive Past Participle
puff puffed
work worked
miss missed
watch watched

However, when the ending ed is added to verbs which end in d or t, the ed ending of the past participle is pronounced as a separate syllable. The reason for this is that the sounds of d and t are so similar to the sound of the ed ending, that the ending must be pronounced as a separate syllable in order to be heard clearly.

In each of the following examples, the bare infinitive consists of one syllable; whereas the past participle consists of two syllables. For example:

Bare Infinitive Past Participle
add added
land landed
hunt hunted
wait waited

Similarly, when d is added to verbs ending in a silent e preceded by d or t, the final ed of the past participle is pronounced as a separate syllable. In each of the following examples, the bare infinitive consists of one syllable; whereas the past participle consists of two syllables. For example:

Bare Infinitive Past Participle
fade faded
glide glided
cite cited
note noted

Traducción:

Pronunciación de poner fin a la ed

El fin ed generalmente no se pronuncia como una sílaba. Por ejemplo, en cada uno de los siguientes ejemplos, tanto el desnudo infinitivo y el participio pasado consisten en una sílaba. Por ejemplo:

Sin embargo, cuando la terminación ed se añade a los verbos que terminan en d o t, ed el final de la participio pasado se pronuncia como una sílaba. La razón de esto es que los sonidos de d y no son tan similar al sonido de la edición final, que el fin debe ser pronunciada como una sílaba, a fin de ser oído claramente.

En cada uno de los ejemplos siguientes, el desnudo infinitivo consta de una sílaba, mientras que el participio pasado se compone de dos sílabas. Por ejemplo:

Del mismo modo, cuando d se añade a los verbos que terminan en una silenciosa e precedida por d o t, ed el final del pasado participio se pronuncia como una sílaba. En cada uno de los ejemplos siguientes, el desnudo infinitivo consta de una sílaba, mientras que el participio pasado se compone de dos sílabas. Por ejemplo:

Conjugador de verbos en inglés (y otros idiomas)

Aquí os presento una herramienta para conjugar verbos en diversos idiomas.

En Logos Conjugator, se puede configurar para otros idiomas.

B: Principales verbos en Inglés (regulares e irregulares)

PRESENTE

PASADO

PARTICIPIO

SIGNIFICA

PRONUNCIACION

BAKE

BAKED

BAKED

HORNEAR

<(béik)

BABLE

BABLED

BABLED

BALBUCEAR

<(bóbl)

BAIT

BAITED

BAITED

CEBAR/AZUZAR

<(béit)

BALANCE

BALANCED

BALANCED

NIVELAR

<(bálans)

BANDAGE

BANDAGED

BANDAGED

VENDAR

<(bándish)

BANISH

BANISHED

BANISHED

AHUYENTAR

<(bánish)

BAPTIZE

BAPTIZED

BAPTIZED

BAUTIZAR

<(baptáiz)

BARE

BARED

BARED

DESNUDAR

<(béer)

BARK

BARKED

BARKED

LADRAR

<(bárk)

BARGAIN

BARGAINED

BARGAINED

REGATEAR

<(bérgin)

BASTE

BASTED

BASTED

HILVANAR

<(béist)

BASTE

BASTED

BASTED

PRINGAR

<(béist)

BATTLE

BATTLED

BATTLED

BATALLAR

<(bátl)

BAT

BATTED

BATTED

BATEAR

<(bát)

BATTER

BATTERED

BATTERED

GOLPEAR

<(bárer)

BANISH

BANISHED

BANISHED

DESTERRAR

<(bénish)

BEG

BEGGED

BEGGED

ROGAR

<(bég)

BEHAVE

BEHAVED

BEHAVED

COMPORTARSE

<(bijéif)

BEHEAD

BEHEADED

BEHEADED

DECAPITAR

<(bijéd)

BELONG

BELONGED

BELONGED

PERTENECER

<(bilóng)

BEREAVE

…D

BEREFT/.D

PRIVAR DE

<(biríf)

BESTREW

BESTREWED

BESTREWED

ESPARCIR

<(bistrú)

BIKE

BIKED

BIKED

MONTAR BICI

<(báik)

BICYCLE

BICYCLED

BICYCLED

MONTAR BICI

<(báicikol)

BILK

BILKED

BILKED

ESTAFAR

<(bílk)

BILL

BILLED

BILLED

FACTURA

<(bíol)

BLAB

BLABED

BLABED

DIVULGAR

<(bláb)

BLAME

BLAMED

BLAMED

CULPAR

<(bléim)

BLAST

BLASTED

BLASTED

EXPLOTAR

<(blást)

BLEACH

BLEACHED

BLEACHED

BLANQUEAR

<(blích)

BLEND

BLENDED

BLENDED

MEZCLAR

<(blénd)

BLESS

BLESSED

BLESSED

BENDECIR

<(blés)

BLIND

BLINDED

BLINDED

CEGAR

<(bláind)

BLINK

BLINKED

BLINKED

PARPADEA

<(blínk)

BLISTER

BLISTERED

BLISTERED

AMPOLLAR

<(blístor)

BLOCK

BLOCKED

BLOCKED

BLOQUEAR

<(blok)

BLOOM

BLOOMED

BLOOMED

FLORECER

<(blúm)

BLOT

BLOTTED

BLOTTED

MANCHAR

<(blót)

BLUFF

BLUFFED

BLUFFED

ENGAÑAR

<(bláf)

BOARD

BOARDED

BOARDED

EMBARCAR

<(bórd)

BORROW

BORROWED

BORROWED

PEDIR PRESTADO

<(bórrou)

BOTHER

BOTHERED

BOTHERED

MOLESTAR

<(bóthor)

BOTTLE

BOTTLED

BOTTLED

EMBOTELLAR

<(bátl)

BOUNCE

BOUNCED

BOUNCED

REBOTAR

<(báuns)

BOSS

BOSSED

BOSSED

MANDAR

<(bós)

BRACE

BRACED

BRACED

REFORZAR

<(bréis)

BRAID

BRAIDED

BRAIDED

TRENZAR

<(bréid)

BRAKE

BRAKED

BRAKED

FRENAR

<(bréik)

BRIBE

BRIBED

BRIBED

SOBORNAR

<(bráib)

BROADCAST

BROADCASTED

BROADCASTED

TRANSMITIR

<(bróudcast)

BUCKLE

BUCKLED

BUCKLED

ABROCHAR

<(bókl)

BURN

BURNT/BURNED

BURNT/BURNED

QUEMAR

<(börn)

BRUSH

BRUSHED

BRUSHED

CEPILLAR

<(brósh)

BACKBITE

BACKBIT

BACKBITTEN

MURMURAR

<(bákbáit)

BACKSLIDE

BACKSLID

BACKSLID

RECAER

<(bakláid)

BE

WAS/WERE

BEEN

SER/ESTAR

<(bi)

BEAR

BORE

BORN

NACER

<(ber)

BEAT

BEAT

BEATEN

PALPITAR/DERROTAR

<(bít)

BECOME

BECAME

BECOME

CONVERTIRSE

<(bikóm)

BEFALL

BEFELL

BEFALLEN

ACONTECER

<(bifól)

BEGIN

BEGAN

BEGUN

EMPEZAR

<(begín)

BEHOLD

BEHELD

BEHELD

CONTEMPLAR

<(bijóld)

BEND

BENT

BENT

DOBLAR

<(bénd)

BESEECH

BESOUGHT

BESOUGHT

SUPLICAR

<(bisích)

BESET

BESET

BESET

ACOSAR A

<(bisét)

BESPEAK

BESPOKE

BESPOKEN

ENCARGAR A

<(bispík)

BESTRIDE

BESTRODE

BESTRIDDEN

MONTAR

<(bistráid)

BET

BET

BET

APOSTAR

<(bét)

BIND

BOUND

BOUND

ATAR/AMARRAR

<(báind)

BITE

BIT

BITTEN

MORDER/PICAR

<(báit)

BLEED

BLED

BLED

SANGRAR

<(blíd)

BLOW

BLEW

BLOWN

SOPLAR

<(blóu)

BREAK

BROKE

BROKEN

QUEBRAR

<(bréik)

BREED

BRED

BRED

CRIAR

<(bríd)

BRING

BROUGHT

BROUGHT

TRAER

<(bring)

BUILD

BUILT

BUILT

CONSTRUIR

<(bíld)

BURST

BURST

BURST

ESTALLAR

<(bórst)

BUY

BOUGHT

BOUGHT

COMPRAR

<(bái)